Thursday, January 06, 2011

Picture of the day


I know James is supposed to blog the science stuffs, while I stick to delicate feminine topics, but I couldn't resist this delightful image that I found in "Education, politics and opinions about climate change evidence for interaction effect, Lawrence C. Hamilton, Climatic Change, 2010".

12 comments:

Belette said...

Delightful.

Steve Bloom said...

Somewhere along the way James seems to have learned to link to sources, also. :)

James Annan said...

This might help...

John Mashey said...

Dunning-Kruger.

Thomas said...

James, consider all the extra CO2 produced if everyone googles every story. It saves time and energy to just provide a link if you post a story.

James Annan said...

Thomas, of course you are right, I have given jules a good slapping and I hope she won't do it again.

jules said...

But if they have to bother googling it then only those who care will do it, which might actually be more efficient.

Carl C said...

wow, brilliant image and a great find, really sums up modern 'merica!

L Hamilton said...

For anyone interested in reading more about what's behind that graphic, the paper is available online from the journal Climatic Change at

http://www.springerlink.com/content/r463w5h2v7j4151x/fulltext.pdf

I believe their "online first" version becomes unavailable once the print edition of this journal comes out.

cthulhu said...

I fear the graph might just be showing level of interest in subject vs probability of seeing warming as a threat. That strong political advocates tend to lean towards the party line on issues they care about is not actually interesting at all and it wouldn't actually be DK effect. All issues (gun-rights, abortion, etc) may exhibit the same trends.

What I would be interested in is a graph of those not affiliated with any political party.

Anonymous said...

Democrats are smugger than Republicans? Good find! ;)

Mark

John Callender said...

The google link produces extra CO2, but also updates in real-time. The Springerlink reference is now paywalled (as predicted), but "I'm feeling lucky" a few minutes ago produced this PDF of the paper, which, with a little help from academic tenure, might last a little longer.